Browsing All posts tagged under »lying«

Tell Us a Story: Using Pennsylvania’s Laws to Expose Restraining Order Lawlessness

May 7, 2018

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“The court determines a witness’s credibility and may infer fear based on the witness’s testimony describing the defendant’s actions.” —Karch v. Karch, 885 A.2d 535 (Pa. Super. 2005) Complainants of false allegations and judicial bias in restraining order prosecutions express disbelief that lying in court or forming rulings based on lies can be legal. Some […]

What Feminist Writer Sandra Newman Gets Right about False Accusation and Why That Disarms Her Contention That It “Almost Never [Has] Serious Consequences”

March 16, 2018

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In a recent Quartz.com article titled, “What kind of person makes false rape accusations?” (commented on here), novelist Sandra Newman answers that, among others, people with (Cluster B) personality disorders do (sociopaths, narcissists, histrionics, and borderlines), which is true. People who exhibit the traits associated with these disorders, whether clinically or subclinically, are identified in […]

It’s Court, Sport: Lying Isn’t Punished; Only Losing Is

December 18, 2017

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A falsely accused defendant facing trial, especially a scrupulously honest one, should meditate on the title’s maxim long and hard. If it inspires one or more of the following conclusions, then reflection on it has paid off. The truth doesn’t matter if it’s ineffective. The defendant who considers him- or herself a “defendant” and not […]

An Anagram of RationalWiki Is “A Liar—I Know It”: Talking Back to Little Sisters Who Play Big Brother

July 5, 2015

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They have a network of informants. They target dissenters, lump them, and apply a label. They maintain lists. They coerce lockstep conformity with their perspectives by ridicule and censure…. No, I don’t mean the former East German secret police; I mean those liberal/feminist pretenders to enlightenment and humanism whose robotic pronouncements are so clotted with jargon they actually read […]

What “the Law” Means in the Restraining Order Arena and Why All Reasonable Expectations Defendants Have Are Wrong, Wrong, Wrong

May 31, 2015

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“I put a restraining order on my ex-husband. Now he’s depressed and staying in his truck.” “Can a restraining order result in suicide?” “Get [a] restraining order lifted for job.” “Can a restraining order be appealed if there isn’t evidence?” “How will it affect my child custody if I filed a false order for protection?” […]

Inciting Violence: If Lawmakers Require a Compelling Motive for Restraining Order Reform, How about This One?

February 12, 2015

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I examined a case, recently, of a man’s committing murder hours after being accused to the police. My familiarity with the case was, admittedly, shallow; I only had what was reported to go on (and that from a single, “raw” source). I have, however, heard from scores of people who’ve been accused—or scorned for telling […]

You Can’t Sue for Perjury: Why Targets of Restraining Order Fraud and Other Procedural Abuses Based on Lies Get Screwed and Stay Screwed

December 21, 2014

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The postscript (P.S.) to a series of comments left on the blog this week by the stepmother of a man who was falsely accused of violence asks whether he could sue his ex-girlfriend for lying. The details, as the stepmother reports them, are these: Man and woman, who aren’t married, were together for four years […]