THOU SHALT NOT: A Consideration of the Biblical Commandment against False Witness Inspired by Dr. Ray Bredfeldt, an Ex-Deacon Who Deserves to Go to Hell

Posted on February 21, 2019

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This post is inspired by Dr. Ray Bredfeldt, a physician who purports to be a man of faith. By means of one lowlife attorney and then a second equally unscrupulous one, whose conduct during a rape trial attained minor notoriety, Dr. Bredfeldt and his son and daughter-in-law sought to have me wrongfully imprisoned while my father lay dying. The reader may conclude from these details that court process corrupts or that the corrupt are drawn to court process…but s/he may not conclude otherwise.


Today, in a dialogue dominated by #MeToo jihadists, voices denouncing false or unfounded accusation are as quickly overwhelmed as those of sanitation workers responding to a sewer explosion.

It’s accordingly kinda great to count God Almighty’s voice as an exception.

Not bad, either, is knowing that if He’s up there taking notes, which He’s reputed to be very meticulous about, the karma of false accusers stands to be more than just a bitch.

Think snap-crackle-pop, like, forever.

And that’s discounting the liberties demons might take when they’re bored and horny—which I would imagine is pretty much always.

Some of those who have or who had intended to witness against me in court, either to have me denied rights or to have me locked up, would know better than I, though.

They style themselves pious Christian souls—and I would wager that many people who’ve been falsely accused include the indifference of hypocrites like these in their litany of grievances.

In my case, take Dr. Michael Honeycutt, Ph.D., chairman of the EPA’s Science Advisory Boards, who identifies himself as a dedicated churchgoer. (Mike also reports he’s “active in…Boy Scouts.” That I have no problem believing at all.) Although he’s never met me, Mike willingly testified against me in 2013 on behalf of his protégée, Tiffany Bredfeldt, a crackpot who harassed me for over a decade through law enforcement and the courts following a three-month association at my own home…where she was routinely to be found at night minus her wedding ring.

Or take Dr. Ray Bredfeldt, M.D. (“First, do no harm”). When the accusations against me by his daughter-in-law began in 2006, I recall reading he was a church deacon. I subsequently learned he and his wife, Ruth, hosted Bible study classes in their home and that their daughter Kim was married to Presbyterian pastor Jeremy Cheezum (who ignored my pleas for his help in mediating a settlement of the matter, pleas made fully eight years ago).

Here’s testimony Ray Bredfeldt’s daughter-in-law, Tiffany, gave in court during a 2013 hearing (that’s seven years after her accusations started):

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Ray Bredfeldt’s family’s version of conservative Christianity differs considerably from the one I knew growing up. When I was a boy, there was no conceivable chance a married woman could be mistaken for single, least of all by a man she met and discussed her underwear with alone in the dark. The word my Southern Baptist family would have used to characterize such a woman the reader will guess easily enough.

Ray’s daughter-in-law broadly accused me from 2006 to 2016 of “pursu[ing]” her, “proposition[ing]” her, trying to kiss her, and making “physical, romantic advances” toward her despite “rebuff[s]” and “rebuke[s]” based largely on a 12-week “friendship” in 2005 during which, by her own sworn admission, she never felt any urgent need to inform me she was married.

I don’t have to call her a liar; the contradictions are obvious and—and—they always were.

Reverend Ray was nonetheless prepared in 2016 (that’s 10 years later) to make sworn statements against me to have me jailed for a year and judicially forbidden (on pain of further incarceration) from ever sharing these contradictions with anyone in my defense. Because what would the neighbors think, right? Never mind, apparently, whether God might take a dim view of his daughter-in-law’s conduct…and his own.

Where Ray’s son, Phil Bredfeldt, was while his wife was indulging herself at my home in 2005 has incidentally never been explained. I don’t recall a single conversation I ever had with Tiffany Bredfeldt, including up to and past midnight, being interrupted by a phone call (“Uh, Honey, are you coming home?”). If Phil Bredfeldt were homosexual, that would explain a lot, both about his conduct and the keenness of his family’s interest in keeping up appearances.

At any rate, things didn’t ultimately work out the way they had envisioned.

Telling to note in this context is that at the conclusion of the closest thing to a trial that ever occurred in 12 years of courthouse mischief, Tiffany Bredfeldt, herself the daughter of a fundamentalist parishioner, exclaimed, “God damn it.”

Well, here’s hoping, anyhow.

It turns out the Jews—at least once upon a time—appreciated false witness to be the grave and consequential trespass that it is, so much so that they ranked it a cardinal no-no. Yahweh’s even reported to have carved its prohibition in stone, which seems fairly emphatic. According to Proverbs (stresses added):

There are six things that the LORD strongly dislikes, seven that are an abomination to him: haughty eyes, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, a heart that devises wicked plans, feet that make haste to run to evil, a false witness who breathes out lies, and one who sows discord among brothers.

Witnesses in prosecutions may wear the same suit to court that they do to church. But in my experience of legal games, imperatives of the soul take a backseat in the courthouse to cardinal sins, like avarice and wrath, and avoiding blame in this life is the definite priority.

If the avowed faith of people like Ray Bredfeldt has the cosmic order of things right, though, escaping a court’s censure is only a very temporary reprieve from judgment.

Copyright © 2019 RestrainingOrderAbuse.com

*Jezebel, the millennial feminist house organ, which takes its name from a Biblical figure, tends to discount false accusation and its damages. The sophistical line of reasoning, demonstrated, for example, by Donna Zuckerberg in “He Said, She Said: The Mythical History of the False Rape Allegation,” conflates the phrase “false allegation” with “false rape allegation” and dismisses both collectively as extremely rare, apparently on the basis of the number of criminal allegations of rape that are determined to be untrue by, perhaps, the FBI. Rape allegations can, of course, be judged “worthy” by a court based on no standard of actual proof at all. (A rape claim made in a civil proceeding can be validated simply by default, for example, because a defendant was unable to travel cross-country on his own dime to appear in his defense. How often this happens is tabulated nowhere, though civil “protective order” cases are estimated to number in the millions per annum.) False accusation, what’s more, can include any number of ruinous claims other than sexual assault. False accusation can also be chronic. So mountainous is the political resistance to acknowledging it happens at all, it’s perpetrated with impunity. Ms. Zuckerberg surveys literary instances of false rape allegations, including Biblical ones, and finds grounds to deride them. A story she ignores is that of Jezebel, who amid a career of wickedness conspired to have a man falsely accused and stoned to death. His alleged crime was blasphemy, not rape. Jezebel was fittingly thrown from a window to become fodder for stray dogs—as today the tabloid website that bears her name is.

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