Browsing All posts tagged under »First Amendment«

BABY ON BOARD: Restraining Order by Virginia Vice Mayor Sunny Reynolds Kneecaps Town Council Election Rival Who “Pointed His Finger at Her”; Letter to the Editor Criticizes Conduct

March 11, 2018


The administration of restraining orders is a frequent target of censure by First Amendment scholar and UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh in his blog, The Volokh Conspiracy. That’s because restraining orders may be exploited, besides as gag orders generally, as SLAPPs to suppress political speech, which the First Amendment is there to protect above all […]

What Defamation Is and Isn’t: On Writing about Abuses of Process

December 27, 2017


“Libel and slander are legal claims for false statements of fact about a person that are printed, broadcast, spoken or otherwise communicated to others. Libel generally refers to statements or visual depictions in written or other permanent form, while slander refers to verbal statements and gestures. The term defamation is often used to encompass both […]

Weston Solutions Dirt Engineer Phil Bredfeldt Complains to the Court That He’s Been Stalked

November 8, 2016


Philip (“Phil”) Bredfeldt is a geoscientist employed by Weston Solutions in Austin, Texas. The writer babysat Mr. Bredfeldt’s wife for three months in 2005 (September through early December). During the 2016 court procedure this post describes, the latest of many initiated or inspired by this couple over a 10-year period, Mr. Bredfeldt testified he “never […]

If You’re Determined to Write about an Unjust Restraining Order (or Other Procedural Violation), There’s No Point in NOT Naming Names

September 16, 2016


The title of this post requires qualification. There is a reason not to name names in critical speech, especially speech that’s published: It’s safer, because you’re less likely to provoke the subject’s wrath. The catch is that if you write so innocuously (i.e., so generally and anonymously) that the subject doesn’t care, then your speech will […]

NoEthics.Net Holds Judges and Lawyers Accountable to the Laws They Ply

September 5, 2016


David Palmer’s website provides a service that may not be its author’s first priority but is certainly a valuable one: It puts the shoe on the other foot. Mr. Palmer outs officers of the court who’ve been publicly censured for misconduct—and more than a few of them have felt the pinch. Here’s how one […]

Why Judicial Process Is Corrupt: The “Customer” Is Always Right

September 2, 2016


Everyone angered by procedural abuse has a different grievance: false allegations of domestic violence, civil rights violations, wrongful claims of child abuse, exploitation of process to silence critics, and even lying about rape, to name a few. Typically, it’s what sort of procedural abuse a person has experienced—or someone close to that person has experienced—that […]

The Female of the Species Is More Deadly than the Male: A Restraining Order Plot Twist That Fans of Novelist Gillian Flynn Will Appreciate

May 29, 2016


The previous post concerned the interpersonal and legal travails of a blogger who brought her story to my attention last week. Jenny has twice been served (this month) with restraining orders alleging “domestic violence” that were petitioned by an ex-boyfriend with whose son she had formed a parental attachment. The “man” resents her talking about […]