Browsing All posts tagged under »First Amendment«

Singer-Songwriter Kat McSnatch Knows How You Feel (“Can She Say That? Can I?”)

April 12, 2018

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The angry speech of people who’ve been falsely accused in one or another legal procedure and labeled freakish, scary, or violent is often highlighted to imply that because they use “bad words,” they must be bad people whose claims of injustice aren’t worthy of consideration. Such people have been wrongly deprived of some or all of the […]

A Portrait of South Texas College’s Jen Terpstra, a High-Conflict Liar, Vexatious Complainant, Abuser of Court Process, and Headcase

April 8, 2018

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“Perhaps I really am a witch after all (as I have been called a time or two by my funny husband).” —Jennifer Terpstra, who prosecuted her “funny husband” three years later I’m loath to display a photograph of the woman quoted above. If I did, though, I’m sure you’d agree with her. This woman, a […]

Previously Paddled Attorney Chris Scileppi Tells an Arizona Superior Court Judge That This Blog’s Author Has “Terrorized” and “Demonized” His Clients with Computer Code—and Isn’t Jeered out of the Room

March 27, 2018

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What this post relates is typical of prosecutorial conduct in restraining order cases, besides generally. The imperative, which is both profligate and malicious, is simply to win. Neither merit nor justice has anything to do with it. The post revisits a 2016 hearing whose object was to have the writer jailed. To remind those who […]

BABY ON BOARD: Restraining Order by Virginia Vice Mayor Sunny Reynolds Kneecaps Town Council Election Rival Who “Pointed His Finger at Her”; Letter to the Editor Criticizes Conduct

March 11, 2018

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The administration of restraining orders is a frequent target of censure by First Amendment scholar and UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh in his blog, The Volokh Conspiracy. That’s because restraining orders may be exploited, besides as gag orders generally, as SLAPPs to suppress political speech, which the First Amendment is there to protect above all […]

What Defamation Is and Isn’t: On Writing about Abuses of Process

December 27, 2017

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“Libel and slander are legal claims for false statements of fact about a person that are printed, broadcast, spoken or otherwise communicated to others. Libel generally refers to statements or visual depictions in written or other permanent form, while slander refers to verbal statements and gestures. The term defamation is often used to encompass both […]

Weston Solutions Dirt Engineer Phil Bredfeldt Complains to the Court That He’s Been Stalked

November 8, 2016

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Philip (“Phil”) Bredfeldt is a geoscientist employed by Weston Solutions in Austin, Texas. The writer babysat Mr. Bredfeldt’s wife for three months in 2005 (September through early December). During the 2016 court procedure this post describes, the latest of many initiated or inspired by this couple over a 10-year period, Mr. Bredfeldt testified he “never […]

If You’re Determined to Write about an Unjust Restraining Order (or Other Procedural Violation), There’s No Point in NOT Naming Names

September 16, 2016

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The title of this post requires qualification. There is a reason not to name names in critical speech, especially speech that’s published: It’s safer, because you’re less likely to provoke the subject’s wrath. The catch is that if you write so innocuously (i.e., so generally and anonymously) that the subject doesn’t care, then your speech will […]