Browsing All posts tagged under »fraud«

A Portrait of South Texas College’s Jen Terpstra, a High-Conflict Liar, Vexatious Complainant, Abuser of Court Process, and Headcase

April 8, 2018

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“Perhaps I really am a witch after all (as I have been called a time or two by my funny husband).” —Jennifer Terpstra, who prosecuted her “funny husband” three years later I’m loath to display a photograph of the woman quoted above. If I did, though, I’m sure you’d agree with her. This woman, a […]

Why Are Pro Se Defendants More Suspect in the Eyes of Judges than Lying Accusers?

February 26, 2018

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Showing candor that was as unexpected as it was refreshing, a judge I stood before in August acknowledged that he knew restraining orders were “abused” by litigants who made “blatantly false” statements to the police and the court. Doing the former is a misdemeanor crime; the latter, a felony. The judge, Tony Riojas, besides being […]

Presiding Tucson City Court Judge Antonio Riojas Acknowledges Restraining Orders Are “Abused” by “People Who…Say Things That Are Just Blatantly False”

January 10, 2018

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The contents of this brief post are excerpted from the previous one. They’re highlighted separately here because of their almost unique significance. It’s very rare for a judge to frankly criticize the protective order process and the indifference of the justice system to false accusation. The occasion that prompted the judge’s candid discussion of the […]

Legal Abuse and “Learned Helplessness” (Including Commentary on the Mythical Value of “Taking the High Road”)

November 28, 2015

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“Learned helplessness is behavior typical of an organism (human or animal) that has endured repeated painful or otherwise aversive stimuli which it was unable to escape or avoid. After such experience, the organism often fails to learn escape or avoidance in new situations where such behavior would be effective. In other words, the organism seems […]

Litigation Privilege: Why Restraining Order Fraud Is Pandered to and Why the Falsely Accused Are Denied Recourse to the Law for Vindication, Relief, and Recovery of Damages

October 21, 2015

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“Fraud is deliberately deceiving someone else [including a judge] with the intent of causing damage.” —Cornell Legal Information Institute “Generally, lying during trial (or any other part of litigation) is expected to come out at the time of trial. This means an action against someone for lying during a prior proceeding would fail because even […]

“There’s No Justice System; There’s Just a System”: A California Paralegal’s Advice on Defending Yourself against a Restraining Order Based on Fraud

September 29, 2015

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The commentary and advice that follow are from a “paralegal at a top-tier criminal defense firm in Southern California.” I will go on record saying we have some clients that were slapped with permanent restraining orders and some were also on probation for prior convictions while the restraining order injunction was issued. A number of […]

Understanding the Significance of False Accusations in Restraining Order and Related “Trials”

September 23, 2015

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Misperception of the significance of false accusations is a topic that’s been considered in past posts on this blog, particularly false accusations of sexual assault, which are the only false accusations anyone seems to believe are deserving of mention. It’s wrong to say that the nature of false accusations doesn’t matter. But more relevant to […]