Browsing All posts tagged under »abuse of process«

Why Are Pro Se Defendants More Suspect in the Eyes of Judges than Lying Accusers?

February 26, 2018


Showing candor that was as unexpected as it was refreshing, a judge I stood before in August acknowledged that he knew restraining orders were “abused” by litigants who made “blatantly false” statements to the police and the court. Doing the former is a misdemeanor crime; the latter, a felony. The judge, Tony Riojas, besides being […]

What Defamation Is and Isn’t: On Writing about Abuses of Process

December 27, 2017


“Libel and slander are legal claims for false statements of fact about a person that are printed, broadcast, spoken or otherwise communicated to others. Libel generally refers to statements or visual depictions in written or other permanent form, while slander refers to verbal statements and gestures. The term defamation is often used to encompass both […]

Weston Solutions Dirt Engineer Phil Bredfeldt Complains to the Court That He’s Been Stalked

November 8, 2016


Philip (“Phil”) Bredfeldt is a geoscientist employed by Weston Solutions in Austin, Texas. The writer babysat Mr. Bredfeldt’s wife for three months in 2005 (September through early December). During the 2016 court procedure this post describes, the latest of many initiated or inspired by this couple over a 10-year period, Mr. Bredfeldt testified he “never […]

If You’re Determined to Write about an Unjust Restraining Order (or Other Procedural Violation), There’s No Point in NOT Naming Names

September 16, 2016


The title of this post requires qualification. There is a reason not to name names in critical speech, especially speech that’s published: It’s safer, because you’re less likely to provoke the subject’s wrath. The catch is that if you write so innocuously (i.e., so generally and anonymously) that the subject doesn’t care, then your speech will […]

Why the Restraining Order Is the Perfect White Trash Instrument of Malice

February 27, 2016


People who exploit restraining orders are not necessarily victims, and they’re not necessarily the “good guys.” This post will be brief. Its only ambition is to show why restraining orders present trashy people with the chance to commit malicious acts with far-reaching and permanent consequences—and to do it hands-free using our justice system as their bully […]

How Restraining Order Fraud is Motivated and Concealed by VAWA and Its Advocates

December 28, 2015


The previous post, which highlights how fraudulent abuse of process is promoted and disguised, contains a link to a PDF prepared by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) called “Comparison of VAWA 1994, VAWA 2000 and VAWA 2005 Reauthorization Bill.” The acronym VAWA stands for the federal Violence Against Women Act, which was ratified over […]

Litigation Privilege: Why Restraining Order Fraud Is Pandered to and Why the Falsely Accused Are Denied Recourse to the Law for Vindication, Relief, and Recovery of Damages

October 21, 2015


“Fraud is deliberately deceiving someone else [including a judge] with the intent of causing damage.” —Cornell Legal Information Institute “Generally, lying during trial (or any other part of litigation) is expected to come out at the time of trial. This means an action against someone for lying during a prior proceeding would fail because even […]