Browsing All posts tagged under »false allegations«

Why Are Pro Se Defendants More Suspect in the Eyes of Judges than Lying Accusers?

February 26, 2018


Showing candor that was as unexpected as it was refreshing, a judge I stood before in August acknowledged that he knew restraining orders were “abused” by litigants who made “blatantly false” statements to the police and the court. Doing the former is a misdemeanor crime; the latter, a felony. The judge, Tony Riojas, besides being […]

Presiding Tucson City Court Judge Antonio Riojas Acknowledges Restraining Orders Are “Abused” by “People Who…Say Things That Are Just Blatantly False”

January 10, 2018


The contents of this brief post are excerpted from the previous one. They’re highlighted separately here because of their almost unique significance. It’s very rare for a judge to frankly criticize the protective order process and the indifference of the justice system to false accusation. The occasion that prompted the judge’s candid discussion of the […]

If Restraining Order Cases Are Only about Narrative, How Do You Beat a Liar in Court?

September 16, 2016


The next to last post stressed the importance of narrative in restraining order cases. Stories complainants tell pursuant to obtaining a restraining order don’t particularly matter. “I’m afraid” may suffice. In contrast, defendants’ narratives are critical. Strategic defense is not about “telling the truth.” It’s about telling the better story. Competing narratives are universally regarded […]

Restraining Order Cases Are about One Thing: NARRATIVE

September 15, 2016


The universal conviction is that the court involves itself in a citizen’s life because the citizen did something wrong. Even judges are inclined to believe this. It’s wrong, and they’re wrong—and it’s very wrong of them to be wrong about something so important. The court involves itself in a citizen’s life because someone (automatically designated […]

FABRY v. POWERS: An Injunction against a Woman That Underscores the Wastefulness and Absurdity of the Restraining Order Process, and Its Licensing of Civil Rights Violations by the Courts

May 12, 2016


Contents of this post were independently investigated by the writer. He alone is responsible for the post’s authorship. Here is a chart prepared by the “state administrative offices of the courts” in 2010 that puts the number of “general” and “limited” jurisdiction state courts in our country at about 30,000. Here is a single judge’s docket for this […]

Evidence of Perjury Cannot Be Used to Appeal a Fraudulently Obtained Restraining Order

May 1, 2016


Someone once told me that the only value of a lock is to keep an honest man honest. The value of perjury statutes is exactly the same: They make an honest person extra careful about what s/he tells the court. To a liar (the person they’re supposed to thwart), they’re just “blah-blah-blah.” Perjury (often recognized […]

“Somebody Do Something to End This Madness!”: One Commenter’s Appeal for Restraining Order Reform

October 22, 2015


A comment Wednesday resonated with the author’s experiences of legal abuse and many others’. It said its writer’s life was trashed because he showed compassion for another. He exhausted his savings to help his ex-wife out of a fix, flying out to California from Colorado on a day’s notice. Five years later, having lived with […]