Browsing All posts tagged under »defamation«

Texas Officials Michael Honeycutt and Tiffany Bredfeldt Allege Sexual Solicitation in Contradictory Testimony to the Arizona Superior Court, Implicating a Tucson Man Who’s Been Falsely Accused for 11 Years: ILLEGAL GAG ORDER GUTTED; “WOMEN’S LAW,” TCEQ DISCREDITED

January 1, 2018

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This post, published on the first day of the year, was updated on July 9, 2018 (reflected in the new title), and content that had been unlawfully censored by the court has been restored. A recent respondent to this blog commented, “I think these injunctions violate the Constitution.” Despite the baggy parameters dictated by the […]

What Defamation Is and Isn’t: On Writing about Abuses of Process

December 27, 2017

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“Libel and slander are legal claims for false statements of fact about a person that are printed, broadcast, spoken or otherwise communicated to others. Libel generally refers to statements or visual depictions in written or other permanent form, while slander refers to verbal statements and gestures. The term defamation is often used to encompass both […]

NoEthics.Net Holds Judges and Lawyers Accountable to the Laws They Ply

September 5, 2016

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David Palmer’s website NoEthics.net provides a service that may not be its author’s first priority but is certainly a valuable one: It puts the shoe on the other foot. Mr. Palmer outs officers of the court who’ve been publicly censured for misconduct—and more than a few of them have felt the pinch. Here’s how one […]

Litigation Privilege: Why Restraining Order Fraud Is Pandered to and Why the Falsely Accused Are Denied Recourse to the Law for Vindication, Relief, and Recovery of Damages

October 21, 2015

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“Fraud is deliberately deceiving someone else [including a judge] with the intent of causing damage.” —Cornell Legal Information Institute “Generally, lying during trial (or any other part of litigation) is expected to come out at the time of trial. This means an action against someone for lying during a prior proceeding would fail because even […]

Is the Horror of False Accusation More Urgent and Credible when Harvard Law Prof Alan Dershowitz Describes It?

January 22, 2015

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From “A Nightmare of False Accusation That Could Happen to You” by Alan M. Dershowitz (The Wall Street Journal, Jan. 14, 2015): Imagine the following situation: You’re a 76-year-old man, happily married for nearly 30 years, with three children and two grandchildren. You’ve recently retired after 50 years of teaching at Harvard Law School. You […]

Restraining Orders as “Revenge Porn”

November 29, 2014

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In the second season of HBO’s The Newsroom, a lead character is exposed on a website called Revenge Porn by a man with whom she’d had a brief fling. After sitting huddled in a corner and pronouncing, “I want to die,” she rallies and confronts her former lover while he’s conducting a business meeting. Without […]

“Predator” v. “Porn Star”: Restraining Order Fraud, False Allegations, and Suing for Defamation

October 26, 2014

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People falsely alleged to be abusers on restraining order petitions, particularly men, are treated like brutes, sex offenders, and scum by officers of the court and its staff, besides by authorities and any number of others. Some report their own relatives remain suspicious—often based merely on finger-pointing that’s validated by some judge in a few-minute procedure (and that’s when […]