Browsing All posts tagged under »lying to the court«

If Restraining Order Cases Are Only about Narrative, How Do You Beat a Liar in Court?

September 16, 2016

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The next to last post stressed the importance of narrative in restraining order cases. Stories complainants tell pursuant to obtaining a restraining order don’t particularly matter. “I’m afraid” may suffice. In contrast, defendants’ narratives are critical. Strategic defense is not about “telling the truth.” It’s about telling the better story. Competing narratives are universally regarded […]

Restraining Order Cases Are about One Thing: NARRATIVE

September 15, 2016

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The universal conviction is that the court involves itself in a citizen’s life because the citizen did something wrong. Even judges are inclined to believe this. It’s wrong, and they’re wrong—and it’s very wrong of them to be wrong about something so important. The court involves itself in a citizen’s life because someone (automatically designated […]

You Can’t Sue for Perjury: Why Targets of Restraining Order Fraud and Other Procedural Abuses Based on Lies Get Screwed and Stay Screwed

December 21, 2014

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The postscript (P.S.) to a series of comments left on the blog this week by the stepmother of a man who was falsely accused of violence asks whether he could sue his ex-girlfriend for lying. The details, as the stepmother reports them, are these: Man and woman, who aren’t married, were together for four years […]

Blame, No Shame: Restraining Order Abuse by High-Conflict, Personality-Disordered Plaintiffs

April 3, 2014

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“Court is perfectly suited to the fantasies of someone with a personality disorder: There is an all-powerful person (the judge) who will punish or control the other [person]. The focus of the court process is perceived as fixing blame—and many with personality disorders are experts at blame. There is a professional ally who will champion […]