Browsing All posts tagged under »frivolous restraining orders«

Warrenton, Virginia Vice Mayor Sunny Reynolds Explains What Legitimates the Protective Order Process

March 15, 2018

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“[Warrenton, Virginia Vice Mayor Sunny] Reynolds called the protective order process ‘very difficult, both timewise and emotionally’ and said she ‘could not imagine someone [enduring it] if they didn’t have a legitimate complaint.’” —Jill Palermo, Fauquier Times The previous post examined Virginia politician Sunny Reynolds’ “legitimate complaint” to a court, indulged at a cost to […]

BABY ON BOARD: Restraining Order by Virginia Vice Mayor Sunny Reynolds Kneecaps Town Council Election Rival Who “Pointed His Finger at Her”; Letter to the Editor Criticizes Conduct

March 11, 2018

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The administration of restraining orders is a frequent target of censure by First Amendment scholar and UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh in his blog, The Volokh Conspiracy. That’s because restraining orders may be exploited, besides as gag orders generally, as SLAPPs to suppress political speech, which the First Amendment is there to protect above all […]

Low and Outside: An Umpire’s Story of Restraining Order Abuse (by an Underhand Screwball)

June 6, 2015

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The common assumption—one that’s been vigorously enforced by advocates of the “abuse industry”—is that restraining orders are used to protect “victims” from “abusers.” So-called abusers are represented as violent husbands or boyfriends, or as stalkers, representations that account for the ubiquity of restraining orders and the ease of their procurement. The man whose story of […]

A Word on Restraining Order Statistics and the Rate of False Restraining Orders

March 23, 2015

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I responded to a paper published last year by law professor Kelly Behre, who took umbrage that so-called FRGs (father’s rights groups) were promulgating the statistic that 80% of restraining orders were frivolous or false. This conjectural statistic (60 to 80%) was, I believe, postulated by Save Services based on its studying available information, which […]